Skip Nav

Popular Topics

7 Beatles Secrets about Songwriting I wish I'd Discovered Decades Sooner (Part 2)

❶Summary Note that in all of the referenced songs the hooks are heard repeatedly.

‣ How does a song get started? (Good question!)

‣ What is song craft and why do I need it???
Songwriting tips. Learn how to write a song.
Song Writing Help - Part 2

But try using this one to get started. Here are some useful definitions for understanding song structure: The verses in a song all have the same melody but different lyrics. The verse lyrics give us information about the situation, emotions, or people in the song. We may hear the chorus of a song three, four or more times. The lyric and melody remain the same each time it recurs. The chorus lyric sums up the heart of the song. The title of the song almost always appears in the chorus section and may be repeated two or more times.

The bridge has a different melody, lyrics, and chord progression from the verse or chorus. It provides a break from the repetition of verse and chorus. The lyric often provides an insight or revealing moment.

Look at the questions you wrote down in the previous section and choose a question to answer in each section of your song.

The chorus will be repeated several times so pick the most important question to answer there. Be sure to use your title in your chorus! Fill in a few lines around your title answering some of the questions you think listeners might have. Make sure your listeners understand your song by having the singer come right out and say what he or she really feels at least once in the chorus. When you have a rough idea of your chorus lyric, move on to a verse. Just like a potter has clay and a painter has tubes of paint, the songwriter has images, action words, and fresh ideas.

These are your raw materials. What are a few things that are fun, things that make people smile? Parties, dancing, weekends, and vacations. The sound of laughter and music. Favorite foods and a day at the park with friends. A trip to the beach, a night on the town. Bright lights and crowds and carnival rides. These are just rough ideas. Just write down everything that comes to you. Flowers make me think of colors — gold, red, purple — and bees buzzing around.

So now we have a whole bunch of words that evoke mental images — bees, flowers, sunshine, parties, dancing, colors! They all have to do with smiling and feeling good. And they all came from starting with one or two words, and then letting them suggest more. Notice how many words are similar to the ones we came up with.

You make me dance like a fool Forget how to breathe Shine like gold Buzz like a bee Just the thought of you can drive me wild Oh, you make me smile. Now the listener is able to picture how the singer is feeling instead of just having to take her word for it. This is one of the most important tools a songwriter has.

After you have a list of related words, make a list of contrasting words and images, ones that suggest the opposite. Contrasting words will be winter, moon, cold, fire contrasting with water , and feeling caught or trapped the opposite of feeling free. Write down single words or short phrases. And try not to be critical of your ideas — just write down what comes to you. Then, make a list of contrasting words, images, and phrases.

Write as many words as you can think of in each column. Let one idea suggest another and follow the trail wherever it takes you. This is a great exercise for stretching your creativity. When you have a good list of words, try plugging some of them into your verse and chorus lyrics. Replace a statement with an image or action that helps to express the emotion in your song and makes the listener feel what you feel or see what you see.

Every time you open your mouth to speak, you start singing! Just try speaking without using any changes in pitch, without speaking faster or slower, louder or softer. You end up sounding like a robot. Although we usually think of singing as something quite different from talking, we actually use a lot of melody when we talk.

When we talk we use pitch, volume, phrasing, and rhythm — all the elements of a song melody. So if you have a few lyric lines, all you need to do is speak them to get a raw melody started. In fact, just by changing the melody you can give the same words an entirely different emotional meaning. Notice the difference in the melody? In the question, the melody goes up at the end.

In the frightened version, the pitch starts higher and then the melody moves downward. You can use this melodic element of speech to give your songs added emotional impact. Keep the pauses that occur naturally and exaggerate the little ups and downs in your speaking voice. Remember, this is your raw material, not the finished melody. Speak the chorus lyric with as much emotion as you can put into it.

Now, exaggerate the pitches, keeping the rhythm of the words and any pauses that occur naturally. This will get you started on your chorus. Of course, there are other ways to write a song melody but this one will give you a great place to start.

Work on the melody and chords using the verse and chorus lyric you have, gradually smoothing and changing until you have something you like. Then write the rest of the lyric to the final melody. Songs for musical theater are different — they usually do require perfect rhymes. Check out a web site like Rhymedesk. Read my post To Rhyme or Not to Rhyme on my blog site.

Know when to take a break Work on your lyric for short periods of time. Take a walk and let things settle for awhile. Keep the hit song melody in your head. The most important thing and the most difficult is to keep the emotional integrity of the song intact. Keep working on the lyric until you are genuinely moved and excited by it. Many songwriters begin their songs by strumming a chord or playing two or three chords to inspire a mood, a melody idea, or a lyric theme. While song melodies and lyrics are copyrighted, in general, these familiar chord progressions are not.

C-Am-F-G belongs to everyone! You can use this type of generic chord progression in your own songs. Listen to a recent hit song and learn to play along on either guitar or keyboards. There are many YouTube videos that will show you how to play recent hits. These are protected by the copyright law. Learn to play chords If you already have an idea for your melody, you can hunt for the chords that fit. Check out my Resources page for a good one. Or you can take a few lessons from a local music teacher.

Many music stores offer lessons. Your local community center or college may have classes. Or ask friends and neighbors to refer a teacher. We know chords, we know song craft, we know how to follow our emotions — none of this has anything to do with how many dazzling riffs and licks you can play.

Just strum or chord along with your voice and keep the emotional feel front and center. Karaoke tracks offer an instant backing track that can inspire ideas and get you singing your lyrics to a contemporary beat. Go ahead and write a song for friends and family or just for songwriting practice.

The track itself is copyrighted but generally the chords are not. Read on my blog: A lyric with a single, strong emotional focus is ideal for this use. Notice how they enhance and deepen the effect of the scene.

As an exercise, choose a scene and try writing a song that would work with it. Record your vocal and a simple guitar or piano part, then play it softly under the scene to see if it increases the emotional impact.

Time to look for a co-writer! Yeah, they are those people who stand barefoot in coffee shops, playing out-of-tune guitars and singing songs about wheat in the fields and how life is a simple The site also features an active forum where users can congregate and discuss the various aspects of music creation.

The program will begin playing that progression, complete with drums, bass, guitar, and piano parts. If you ever feel like all of your songs sound the same, this program can help you swing out of your rut. A wonderful starting point for any new song. At one time, people actually had to carry around notebooks if they wanted to take notes - remember the once-big fad of Moleskine notebooks?

Nowadays, smartphones have made most pocket objects obsolete. Read More , and it was only a matter of time before someone came up with a similar app for musicians.

RoadWriter combines a lyrics writing app with music playback for songwriting inspiration. Hum is an all-in-one solution that lets you brainstorm, organize, and record your songs using nothing more than your phone. With Hum, that will never be a problem again. You can type out your lyrics and record any associated melodies and Hum will store it away for you. Unfortunately, there is no free version.

Need Help Writing A Song?

Main Topics

Privacy Policy

lyric ideas for songwriters new lyric ideas for songs This site has been designed to help songwriters write song lyrics using new ideas for songs. Whenever free tips, ideas for lyrics or song ideas are needed, this website will give you inspiration for lyric ideas.

Privacy FAQs

Need help writing a song? You’re about to discover a simple formula that will blast you past confusion and have you write songs that you love. Also, you will be left knowing exactly how to.

About Our Ads

Songwriting tips and help to improve your songwriting. In this song writing help article you will discover a simple formula that will allow you to write excellent songs over and over again. What's more, you'll know exactly how to take your songwriting to.

Cookie Info

Hookpad guides you to write a great melody. Sometimes knowing what notes to use in the melody can be the hardest part. Once you've chosen some chords, Hookpad can help you pick notes for your melody by highlighting the notes that are in the chords you've written. This easy-to-use guide will show you how to write a song, from finding a great title to writing your melody. time-tested ideas on this page will help you create a song that expresses your feelings and moves listeners, keeping them involved and interested in what you have to say. If you decide to use one of these chord progressions to.